Total catch in November was nearly 78 thousand tonnes

Total catch of Icelandic vessels in November was 77,902  tonnes, which is a 1% increase from November 2016.  Demersal catch was over 44 thousand tonnes, an increase of 12%.

Of demersal species, the largest amount was in cod, 26,700 tonnes, which is on pair with November 2016. Nearly 5,700 tonnes where caught of saithe, which is more than double the amount of November last year. Pelagic catch was over 31,600 tonnes which consisted of herring and blue-whiting. The herring catch was nearly 24 thousand tonnes and decreased by 25%, but over 7,700 tonnes of blue-whiting were caught which is nearly double tonnage of November 2016. Flatfish catch was 1,350 tonnes, which is a decrease of 12%. Shellfish catch increased by 35%, was 735 tonnes, but was 543 tonnes in November 2016.

Total catch in the 12 month period from December 2016 to November 2017 was 1,166 thousand tonnes, an increse of 10% compared with the same period a year earlier.

The price value index was 5.4% higher than in November 2016

Fish catch
  November   December-November  
  2016 2017 % 2015-2016 2016-2017 %
Fish catch at constant prices            
Index         84.7         89.3 5.4      
             
Fish catch in tonnes            
Total catch 77,530 77,902 1 1,060,149 1,166,454 10
Demersal catch 39,542 44,188 12 461,164 423,033 -8
  Cod 26,715 26,719 0 268,223 248,625 -7
  Haddock 3,188 3,474 9 39,585 35,527 -10
  Saithe 2,757 5,697 107 49,086 48,006 -2
  Redfish 5,061 6,426 27 62,933 59,239 -6
  Other demersal catch 1,821 1,872 3 41,336 31,635 -23
Flatfish 1,527 1,350 -12 24,500 21,768 -11
Pelagic catch 35,918 31,629 -12 561,580 711,342 27
  Herring 32,004 23,888 -25 112,941 132,273 17
  Capelin 0 0 101,089 196,832 95
  Blue whiting 3,914 7,741 98 176,846 216,364 22
  Mackerel 0 0 170,699 165,873 -3
  Other pelagic catch 0 0 5 0
Shellfish 543 735 35 12,818 10,276 -20
Other species 0 0 86 35 -60

Information about catch of fish which are published in this press release are preliminary figures. The data is gathered by the Directorate of Fisheries. 

Statistics

 

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